The Turing Bombe Rebuild Exhibition
Turing Bombe Rebuild
"This electromechanical counting machine was designed to eliminate variables at high speed. Its action was described as 'machines that go on ticking until they reach a combination that will cause them to produce an output'; hence bombe."







Photo: The Turing Bombe Rebuild in B Block © LSA August 2015.
| EXIT | Turing Bombe Rebuild Exhibition | Components | Photo GalleryPETARD |

Introduction

The Bombe Rebuild is operated most days at Bletchley Park. It's worth a trip to go and hear the Bombe ticking and to listen to the story of its construction and use. The Bombe Rebuild was moved to H Block (TNMoC) in 2018.


Turing Bombe  
Rear of Bombe
The electrical components are contained on the hinged section, shown here swung out for access.








Photo: The Bombe Rebuild in B Block © LSA August 2015.
Part of hinged section
Part of hinged section of relays, resistors and condensers.




Photo: The Bombe Rebuild in B Block © LSA August 2015.
End of unit
One end of the unit showing access to more plugs and red wiring.




Photo: The Bombe Rebuild in B Block © LSA July 2007.
Oiling
Centre of photo shows oiling tubes.




Photo: The Bombe Rebuild in B Block © LSA July 2007.
Components  
Showcase
Showcase displaying machined parts and jigs which were an essential part of the rebuild method.




Photo: The Bombe Rebuild in B Block © LSA August 2015.
Wiring and cableform jigs
Wiring and cableform jigs.




Photo: The Bombe Rebuild in B Block © LSA August 2015.
Test drum
A test drum.




Photo: The Bombe Rebuild in B Block © LSA August 2015.
Commutator wiring
Commutator wiring.




Photo: The Bombe Rebuild in B Block © LSA August 2015.
Photo Gallery  
Photo Gallery
A selection of photos taken between 2007 and 2015 of the Bombe Unit Hut 11 and the Rebuild in B Block.




Photo: The Bombe Rebuild display case of components © LSA August 2007 .
PETARD  
PETARD
Before the Bombe Rebuild Team made large numbers of mechanical parts, a test assembly needed to be constructed. This covered all the main parts of the machine, but it was only necessary to make four Letchworth Enigmas driven by shortened vertical and horizontal shafts and one carry cam assembly to achieve this. This unit is capable of demonstrating the full Bombe mechanical action albeit at one third speed. The plan is that when resources become available, this unit will be completed with commutators and a lubrication system etc.. Following this power supply will be added and electric and electronic units developed to turn this whole unit into a permanent working demonstration unit. 
 
The team chose the name Petard because this is another name for a type of small Bomb(e). It is also the name HMS Petard that was instrumental in capturing vital German Enigma material.

Since this photo was taken in 2007, the PETARD unit has been developed into a working demo. More photos on next visit!
   
Dedicated to Margaret Davies who, during the war, worked on a lathe at BTM Letchworth making components for the Bombes.
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