Gaiety Building
The Gaiety Building
The Gaiety Building was the place for evening revue shows  and the best of live entertainment.




Postcard: Gaiety Theatre, Milk Bar and Snack Bar.
| EXIT | Gaiety Theatre |
Gaiety Building

The entrance to the Gaiety Theatre was through the snack bar and up the stairs. There was however a fire exit at the front of the stage (at ground level) which the disabled and elderly could use to gain easy access to the theatre. A striking feature of the auditorium were the life size statues of knights on horses at either side of the stage. The sounds of the powerful electronic organ, in the orchestra pit, could often be heard drifting across the chalet lines.

Others write... "Unfortunately I never got to Clacton, so I've had to 'live it' through postcards, memorabilia and the movie 'Everyday's a Holiday (1964)'. I can still smell the doughnuts cooking at the front of the Gaiety Theatre now!"

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Here we are in 1964 passing by the foyer of the Gaiety Building. I was really excited to be on holiday. We are all wearing our Butlin badges and it's a nice sunny day.

On the left you can just see the 'toy soldiers' towering above the holidaymakers. All of the camp was decorated with lights, smiley faces and fun characters.







Photo: A Butlin Holiday Picture (1964).
   
Gaiety Theatre  
Gaiety Theatre
Butlin's Clacton - Theatre Stage was host to many a famous act, which included the Redcoat Review.


Postcard: Gaiety Theatre Stage.
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This photo is a rather murky shot of the Gaiety Building, probably taken in 1973. The neon sign 'GAIETY THEATRE' is just visible on the rooftop. The photo was taken from the balcony of a chalet in row M Red Camp.


Photo: Chalet lines with Gaiety Theatre in right horizon © 1973 Light Straw Archive.


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